Card Definitions

Playing Cards

Ibraham Ali Mahomed Hafez
The New and Complete Fortune Teller (1816)
Charles Platt
Card Fortune Telling (1865)
Jesse Haney
Madame Zadkiel's Fortune Teller and Mirror of Fate (1884)
Henry J. Wehman
The Witches' Dream Book and Fortune Teller (1885)
Mother Shipton's Gipsy Fortune Teller and Dream Book with Napoleon's Oraculum (1890)
Whitman Publishing Company
Everybody's Book of Luck (1900)
A.E. Waite
Manual of Cartomancy and Occult Divination (1909)
Mohammed Ali
Telling Fortunes by Cards (1914)
Professor P.R.S. Foli
Fortune-Telling by Cards (1915)

Piquet Decks

Charles Platt
Card Fortune Telling (1865)
Whitman Publishing Company
Everybody's Book of Luck (1900)
Mohammed Ali
Telling Fortunes by Cards (1914)
Professor P.R.S. Foli
Fortune-Telling by Cards (1915)

Tarot Cards

Charles Platt
Card Fortune Telling (1865)
A.E. Waite
Manual of Cartomancy and Occult Divination (1909)
The Pictorial Key to the Tarot (1911)
Professor P.R.S. Foli
Fortune-Telling by Cards (1915)

As you likely have noticed, these sources are a bit old. The original spellings of their days have been kept intact. However, many of these lists were taken from epubs and PDFs of "digitized" books. Meaning they were scanned and erroneously translated by a computer program, or worse, by a search engine. "Four of Diamonds" can become "FouK OF DiA3iONDS". As many of those horrid misspellings have been groomed out as much as possible.

Author Relationships

Unsurprisingly, some of these authors have heard of each other, and just as unsurprising, have influenced each other.

The famous Madame Lenormand was a follower of Etteilla.

Éliphas Lévi did not think very highly of Madame Lenormand. He also was considered to be a little inaccurate and off-base with his definitions and beliefs surrounding tarot cards, such as replacing the two horses on 7 The Chariot with two sphinxes.

A.E. Waite was a follower of Papus, and of Éliphas Lévi. While A.E. Waite is fairly famous himself, he has raised a few eyebrows with some of his definitions and symbolism he has given some of his cards. Perhaps due to his fondness of Éliphas Lévi.

The Great Etteilla

Le Célèbre Etteilla was the great exponent of the mysteries of the Tarots in the time of the French Revolution. He was well known in Paris as a hairdresser, but he had a mind above his trade, and proceeded to steep himself in the study of the occult. Having mastered much of the mystic lore then available, he started to evolve a system of his own, invented mystic signs, made cabalistic calculations, drew diagrams, and produced weighty volumes to further the cause to which he had devoted himself. His principal work appeared in 1783, and from being somewhat of a celebrity as Alliette the fashionable hairdresser, he mounted to the top of the ladder of popular favour, and reigned supreme for thirty years as Le Célèbre Etteilla. So much for spelling your name backwards! Disciples and rivals grew up and thronged around him. In the perilous days of 1789, men came to him with blanched lips and drawn features, asking if they might hope to live through the morrow. There were but few "smooth things" to prophesy in those dark days. One cannot help wondering whether he helped any to evade the doom that threatened them.

Etteilla used the Tarots, and adapted them to his own system. Some students of the occult think that he mishandled the sacred emblems of ancient wisdom, but most cartomancers look upon him as one of the chief authorities on fortune-telling by cards, and his method has been made the basis of several subsequent and modern experiments.

— Professor P.R.S. Foli

Major Arcana

Minor Arcana

Clubs ♣ Ace ♣ 2 ♣ 3 ♣ 4 ♣ 5 ♣ 6 ♣ 7 ♣ 8 ♣ 9 ♣ 10 ♣ Page ♣ Jack ♣ Queen ♣ King ♣
Hearts ♥ Ace ♥ 2 ♥ 3 ♥ 4 ♥ 5 ♥ 6 ♥ 7 ♥ 8 ♥ 9 ♥ 10 ♥ Page ♥ Jack ♥ Queen ♥ King ♥
Spades ♠ Ace ♠ 2 ♠ 3 ♠ 4 ♠ 5 ♠ 6 ♠ 7 ♠ 8 ♠ 9 ♠ 10 ♠ Page ♠ Jack ♠ Queen ♠ King ♠
Diamonds ♦ Ace ♦ 2 ♦ 3 ♦ 4 ♦ 5 ♦ 6 ♦ 7 ♦ 8 ♦ 9 ♦ 10 ♦ Page ♦ Jack ♦ Queen ♦ King ♦